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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
by definition by law. either the president has the upper hand on this issue. and the electorate has veted. i mean, in every speech he gave, he addressed this issue. it came up and he said i'm going to do this. and the the electorate said okay. it would be very surprising if we don't allow tax rates-- >> schieffer: this was a very, very close election. the blue states were very blue. the red states were very red. and the battleground states were very close. are you teague to say the president thinks he has some sort of a mandate? >> not a mandate. but he wasn't election-- >> >> schieffer: he got a second chance. >> this is a a good way to address our long-term fescal issues. from an economic perspective-- forget about the politics, you sit down and do the arithmetic or math and you can't make it work unless tax rates on upper income house holds rise. >> schieffer: maya. >> what's outrageous is the way we govern is playing games of chicken and the losers losers are going to be the american public and the economy. we know what's going to have to happen. we know revenues are going to have to go
and opening access to the disabled to public buildings. when george bush signed it into law, it made you proud, whether you were a democrat or republican, a politician or one of the rest of us. >> this historic act is the world's first comprehensive declaration of equality for people with disabilities. >> schieffer: but that was then, and this is now. >> the resolution for ratification is not agreed to. >> schieffer: partisanship runs so deep when an international treaty that callologist other countries to provide the same right to their disabled came to the senate for ratification, conservative republicans blocked it, blocked it despite a dramatic appeal by 89-year-old former republican leader bob dole, himself a disabled world war ii veteran. and even though their usual allies the chamber of commerce and veterans groups wanted it. opponents gave various reasons, arguing the treaty might prevent parents from home schooling. it doesn't. i didn't hear many say, though, how proud blocking it made them feel. some just seemed embarrassed. has washington changed? maybe i'm wrong, but in bob dole's
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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